Five Management Styles and Why They Work (Pt. 1)

jason-kulpa-stylesEffective business management is subjective in that every managed employee is different, therefore requiring a unique approach in terms of their productivity, adherence to office structure and policy, and overall learning pace. 

To get the most out of your direct reports, you will need to identify and leverage an appropriate management style that will foster their strengths and mitigate their weaknesses. Bad management costs businesses billions of dollars each year, so it is imperative that you put your best foot forward as a leader and maintain a healthy management culture.

That said, here are several effective management styles commonly observed in offices spanning countless industries.

Result-Based Management

All management styles are, in a way, result-based, but some managers embrace the long term as a complete basis for success and failure. In this sense, it is not so much about how things are done, so long as they are done quickly and efficiently. This approach may seem cut-and-dry on the surface, but it actually welcomes quite a bit of experimentation; results-based managers are usually open to new ways for employees to accomplish a task, and this openness keeps both the manager and employee focused on what will streamline the work in front of them. When committed to habit, this subconscious problem solving should prove to be a huge asset to the company as a whole.

Inspirational/Extroverted Management

Though not a required characteristic for good leadership, many successful managers are both extroverted and charismatic. These traits can be infectious to subordinate workers; they help to maintain a warm working relationship while humanizing interactions that may otherwise feel mechanical and by-the-numbers in terms of corporate functionality. You want to foster productivity, but you also want to keep the process accessible and comfortable. This boils down to a healthy injection of compassion and consideration, paired with any opportunity to inspire and rally your workers around a goal. In many cases, these workers will perform better throughout the year.

Example-setting Management

Just like results-based management, example-setting management entails characteristics that should technically be observed in all management scenarios; after all, you cannot hope to lead your peers if you are setting a poor example within the context of company demands. However, example setting can be formed into a full-fledged management style depending on how much of an example you are willing to set. Employees will most likely respond more to examples that are both unconventional and healthily over-the-top — those leaders who continuously push the bar and go above and beyond baseline expectations. As a manager, you should already have a knack for ambition and forward thinking, so fully embrace this trait to set the strongest example possible.

 

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *