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Tips for Transitioning into a CEO Role

The role of Chief Executive has been romanticized in most cultures, sometimes to the point where the reality of day-to-day responsibility and the actual impact of a leadership role are frequently overlooked.

Taking the highest office in any organization is a major step in anyone’s career. It is important to understand the proper path to both effectiveness and success. Here are some things to consider.

 

Command

While it may be apocryphal, Admiral Halsey’s admonition to his fellow naval officers is instructive. “When you’re in command, command.” This is advice that should be heeded, especially on a new CEO. The natural tendency for the average person is to try and get along with others, but this can lead to all kinds of problems when “a” manager becomes “the” manager

Ultimately, a chief executive’s main responsibility is to give orders and to see to it they are carried out. Few tasks are personally carried out by a CEO for a number of reasons, not the least of which is if the CEO is doing basic tasks, nobody is in charge.

 

Delegate

A leader’s second major responsibility is to assign tasks to subordinates. These tasks can be both basic day-to-day jobs or the responsibility to be in charge of others. It is not a mistake that most every king in history had a considerable retinue of underlings to carry out their wishes.

Delegation is vitally important. CEOs who do not learn to properly delegate can often find themselves overworked and/or spread too thin to be effective. More than a few well-known chief executives have had their companies and careers damaged by over-reliance on their own talent and skill. One person can only do so much.

 

Communicate

Being in charge and delegating only work properly if a leader is available and listens to his or her subordinates. Without the necessary information from other managers, employees, consultants, ownership and governance, a CEO has little to no contemporary knowledge upon which to base their decisions.

When complaining about their bosses, nearly every employee brings up communication as a chief reason they do not approve of management. A leader must be willing to listen, or they will find it is impossible to be effective or efficient.

Being a CEO is without a doubt one of the hardest jobs in the world. It isn’t for everyone, but even those who have little to no experience will find their task much easier if they learn the fundamentals and put them into practice.

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The best texts on leadership

In today’s world, leadership is needed more than ever. If you want to stand out and achieve success as a leader, you should try reading the following texts:

 

“Getting to Yes” by Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton

This groundbreaking work is based on the Harvard Negotiation Project which was a 1981 book. The strategies for dealing with conflicts in personal and business life set William Ury apart from the industry in terms of teaching negotiating by focusing on interests instead of positions in a deal.

 

“Getting Things Done” by David Allen

If you are having problems staying organized, then David Allen’s text is the first thing you should read. The way to get your ideas and papers in order is to have a framework. This system that Allen lays out is easy to follow and simple to understand. Anyone can turn around their life if they read through to the end and put the tips into practice.

 

“Emotional Intelligence” by Daniel Goleman

In today’s world, it is less about what you know and more about how you can control your emotions. Those that have a solid emotional intelligence score can communicate and progress in work and life more easily.

 

“Crush It!” by Gary Vaynerchuk

 

Gary Vaynerchuk has quickly gained recognition for his ability to cut through the excuses and help people take action in their lives. His book is all about getting through obstacles and never quitting in your pursuit of success. It’s a book every leader should read.

 

“Think and Grow Rich” by Napoleon Hill

This classic on leadership and wealth should be a desktop reference for anyone looking to lead in their lives. The tips are timeless and the writing is succinct and to the point without speaking down to the reader.

When it comes to leadership, it is a process not one event. You must always be looking to get better in your life and career. Reading is a powerful way to do that. Don’t fall behind your peers. Instead, capture opportunity by reading the texts above and taking your ability to lead to the next level.

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Three tips for building rapport with a new employee

The addition of a new employee can be an exciting time for your workplace. Current employees are given a chance to make a new acquaintance while you, as a leader, are able to watch a recent hiring decision pay off for both the hiree and your company. During this period, it is crucial to make new employees feel welcome and comfortable, as the first week at a new job can be stressful and, in some cases, nerve wracking.

Here are some tips for building strong rapport with new employees.

 

Make an effort

As a company leader, it is not great practice to simply throw a new employee to the wolves in terms of workplace integration. Make an effort to learn about these employees; ask them about their personal lives, their interests and hobbies, and their goals in joining your company. The quicker you develop this bond, the quicker you will lay a foundation for this employee’s comfort as a contributor.

 

Give them time

Getting to know a new employee is important, but so is the idea that every worker has a different transition process. Some individuals have trouble adapting to change at the drop of a hat, and therefore, it is important to be cognizant of this notion when dealing with an introverted new employee. In many cases, this employee is probably just adapting to a gauntlet of social interactions with their eager new co-workers. In time, your empathy and patience will pay off once this employee begins to speak up in meetings and actively engage his or her peers.

 

Be available

A new employee is likely going to have a lot of questions in the first days, weeks, and even months of their new role. Though it may seem tedious and exhausting to answer potentially elementary questions, you must be open-minded and remember that these basic matters are, in fact, probably foreign to a new worker. Keep yourself as available as possible to all inquiries; this should be a regular part of your leadership role anyway, regardless of the employee in question. Furthermore, follow up on questions and confusions to make sure they have been fully resolved and that the employee is back on track. Again, this approach will facilitate both employee comfort and productivity.

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Red flags to watch out for during the hiring process

It is easy to experience mixed emotions during the hiring process. On one hand, you may feel stressed out as you search for a candidate that perfectly fits your expectations. On the other hand, you might be excited at the seemingly endless possibilities; for all you know, your next hire could have exceptional work ethic and a likeable personality.

Generally, with the latter in mind, hiring should remain positive and optimistic. However, you must still keep your eyes peeled for a variety of red flags in candidates that may be weak, risky, or simply unfit for the role in question.

Here are a few crucial red flags to watch out for during the hiring process.

 

Negative demeanor

Though this warning sign may seem vague at first, it is important to identify candidates exhibiting a negative or unhealthy demeanor. Common traits of this nature include, but are not limited to dismissiveness, condescending tonality, excessive self-deprecation, and pessimism. You want to focus on candidates that are confident, but not too confident. At the same time, be sure to avoid the common trap of perceiving a insecurity as modesty. In most cases, neither of these candidates will serve your business well.

 

Lack of research

Put simply, your ideal candidate should not only be familiar with the advertised position, but also well-versed in your company as a whole. A lack of proper research will be easy to spot as you ask necessary questions related to both the position and company culture. These candidates present an added gamble in terms of their ability to perform their jobs efficiently, and they are best avoided for this reason alone.

 

Late arrival

Weed out poor candidates from strong ones by disregarding those who showed up late for an interview. This tactic may seem nitpicky at first, but in most cases, a late arrival is extremely telling of a potential employee’s reliability. A job interview is normally an urgent and delicate opportunity for interested candidates, and being late essentially undermines the seriousness of the situation — not to mention it is a telltale sign of carelessness and irresponsibility. Aim for candidates that you can put full faith in as they work to meet deadlines and contribute to corporate goals.

 

Unpleasant surprises

Another obvious red flag in the hiring process is a lack of cohesion between a candidate’s interview and resume. For example, a candidate may include an impressive, albeit short stint with a company in your field, only to surprise you mid-interview by telling you he or she was fired for excessive tardiness. In these situations, it is best to move on to other candidates.

 

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